We all have our nighttime habits. Some of us need a long warm bath before hopping onto bed and dozing off. Others need to read a few pages of the book they are currently reading, while sipping on a cup of home-brewed tea. These are things we do to soothe our energies in preparation for deep rest.

But whenever we are stricken with anxiety, no matter how aptly we prepare ourselves for our ideally eight-hour date with our mattress, the process is simply not as easy and straightforward as it ought to be. We find ourselves tossing and turning in bed for hours before we actually get that much desired shut-eye.

Same goes for our canine pets.

If your dog scratches at their bed come sleeping time, and this scratching is out of the ordinary in terms of intensity, chances are they might be afflicted with canine anxiety. But before we go into that, let us first discuss other relatively more common reasons why dogs scratch their beds.

Why dogs scratch their beds

As we all know, house dogs’ ancestry can be traced back to the wild outdoors. What this means is their family tree originated from wolves and wild canine breeds. As part of these animals’ struggle for survival, they must find for themselves a safe and warm shelter, which they accomplish by way of digging through tough dirt.

This propensity for digging is one trait that even apparently helpless, furry-less pup has retained in their genes. If you see your pet running their paws and claws through their mattress, they might just be reliving their olden traits, back when they had to tough it out in the great outdoors.

Or, they could be releasing pheromones from the glands behind their paws, so as to claim ownership of their bed, which, by the way, they already actually own. But do not burst their bubble. By all means let them exhibit this territorial instinct, which, once again, is a leftover mark of their canine history, so long as they are harming no one.

Or, they might simply be exhibiting their curiosity. Their scratching could be their means of alerting you that there is something strange happening in their bed, whether a scent or some stuff stuck within.

Canine anxiety

Now if your dog’s scratching of their bed has turned into a rather intense habit, it might be time to consult with your vet, if only to ascertain your dog is not actually suffering from anxiety.

Yes, wild scratching can sometimes be more than just a dog’s manifestation of their wild ancestry, but a manifestation of a dog’s battle with anxiety. If this is the case, it is important that you get your pup all the help that they need.

Your vet will know how to go about this problem. They might prescribe you to buy soothing scents to expose your pup to come nighttime. These scents might be enough to calm their nerves.

Furthermore, you can consult with dog experts who are adept in giving training specifically designed to combat canine anxiety.

These options are at your disposal and it is in your best interest to find which of them will work best for your anxious pup.

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